Together we can help end AIDS in Africa Together we can help end AIDS in Africa

Today, with the help of lifesaving medication, an HIV-positive mother can give birth to a healthy HIV-free baby. And that medication can cost as little as 30 cents a day.

Check out the gallery below or read the full story.

  • Read Grace and Nantomba's story
  • Read Blessing's story
  • Read Connie and Lubona's story
  • Read Benson's story
  • Read Prince and Lister's story
  • Read Dailesi, Anthony and Ceasar's story
  • Read Stella and Blessing's story
  • Read Silver's story
  • Read Blessing's story

Grace & Nantomba

In 2012, Grace and Nantomba’s mother, Mary, tested positive for HIV. At the time, Grace was three years old, and fearing for her child’s health, Mary got her tested. Luckily, Grace was found to be HIV–negative. Then with the help of her doctors, Mary began taking ARVs, which not only kept her alive and healthy, but enabled Nantomba to be born HIV–free.

Portrait of Grace and Nantomba

Blessing

In 2003, Blessing’s mom, Rabecca, tested positive for HIV, but at the time, antiretroviral medication, or ARVs, were not widely available or affordable within Zambia. Fortunately though, a year later, after hearing of a brand new clinic offering ARVs for free, she began receiving the lifesaving treatment. These pills not only kept her healthy, but ensured Blessing would be born HIV–free a few years later.

Portrait of Blessing

Connie & Lubona

Connie has been through more than one person ever should. Before she discovered she had HIV, Connie had three children. Unknowingly, while pregnant, the virus passed from her to them—all three later passing away. Despite this devastating loss, Connie has persevered, and with the help of ARVs, she has stayed healthy, counseled women just like her, and in 2012, gave birth to a beautiful HIV–free daughter, named Lubona.

Portrait of Connie and Lubona

Benson

After being diagnosed with HIV, Benson’s mother, Precious, began taking ARVs, preventing Benson and his brothers from being born with the virus.

Portrait of Benson

Prince & Lister

In 2008, after being encouraged by a healthcare worker to get tested, Prince and Lister's mom learned the devastating news: she was HIV–positive. But, there was hope: both her kids were HIV–negative, and with the help of ARVs, she was able to stay healthy as well. Today, thanks to the support of their mother, this smart and funny duo are both in school and thriving.

Portrait of Prince and Lister

Dailesi, Anthony & Ceasar

As an HIV–positive mother of 9, Dailesi’s life is anything but easy. Thankfully though, with free access to ARVs, Dailesi is now healthy enough to care for her large family and even gave birth to two HIV–free twin boys, Anthony and Ceasar.

Portrait of Dailesi, Anthony and Ceasar

Stella & Blessing

Thanks to the help of ARVs, Stella, who is HIV–positive, gave birth to her healthy, HIV–free daughter, Blessing, in 2007.

Portrait of Stella and Blessing

Silver

How do we get one step closer to an AIDS free generation? We ensure that HIV–positive pregnant women like Silver have access to the lifesaving treatment they need to stay healthy and keep their babies HIV–free.

Portrait of Silver

Blessing

Living a two–hour walk from the nearest hospital, Blessing’s mom learned of her positive status only after becoming pregnant. Two days later, she was on ARVs, which protected her daughter from contracting the virus. Today, at 7 years old, Blessing dreams of one day becoming a doctor.

Portrait of Blessing
Bank of America and (RED)

Bank of America and (RED)